Woodworking Plans

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Posted by2 years ago
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So this upcoming weekend I will be building a langsworth hive or two at work. If all goes well this summer, we will be building more, to start adding product to our store.

My biggest concern is getting my supers to match the dimensions of the frames. Does anyone have any schematics they can share with me before I can start trying to build my own as well as any recommendations for frames?

I am about to try hunting all of this down on my own but I figured I'd leave the 1 last update 2020/08/04 a post here to hang out so it can gather some info too!I am about to try hunting all of this down on my own but I figured I'd leave a post here to hang out so it can gather some info too!

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Thank you!

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for 25 comments
Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for 94% Upvoted
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level 1
3 points2 years ago

MAKE A JIG!

level the 1 last update 2020/08/04 2level 2
1 point2 years ago

I use the Incra box joint jig... thing is genius.

level 1
3 points2 years ago

Make it simple.

http://beesource.com/build-it-yourself/

Don't know where you are located, but if anywhere in the U.S. Langstroth equipment would be suggested.

Here are some links about frame sources and the making of frames.

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?325985

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?320153

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?327565

The best wood for making bee hives is what you have available that is relatively light weight. Spruce/pine/fir is the most common type used. Yellow pine can be used but tends to be brittle which can cause problems during assembly.

level 2
Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for 1 point2 years ago

this. I had them printed on legal and laminated at the local staples.

level 1
Beek since '78 Zone6b3 points2 years for 1 last update 2020/08/04 ago2 years agoedited 2 years ago

Follow the plans at beesource (already linked in this thread) except for a flaw in those plans I'll describe below.

Are you using box joints?

If yes then I suggest you reverse the for 1 last update 2020/08/04 box joint pattern shown on those plans.If yes then I suggest you reverse the box joint pattern shown on those plans.

On the side board begin at the bottom with a finger, then the notch. Cut fingers and notches, leaving a finger that is 5/8" wide at the top of the side board. Trim the end of that 5/8" wide finger back 3/8 of an inch.

On the end boards begin with a notch at the bottom, ending with an extra fat finger that is 1-3/8" wide at the top. After you cut the 5/8" x 3/8" rabbet for the frame rest in the top edge of the end you'll see that the rabbet end overlaps the end of the 5/8" wide top finger of the side board that you trimmed back by 3/8" of an inch.

This overlap lets you secure the 3/8" x 5/8" rabbet strip to the side board of your hive, making it considerably stronger and less likely to split off when you use your hive tool to break a heavily propolized frame free from the box, saving you repair work and cuss words.

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Here is what you want:* https://imgur.com/a/l3kRN

edit to add:

The Michigan Beekeepers Association has produced a series of videos called the Beekeepers workshop where they go through building all the hive parts step by step.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vV-7kmLwQ00

Check out all the videos on the channel to build bottom boards, covers, and other parts.

https://www.youtube.com/user/beekeepersworkshop/videos

Tip: frames are cheap and a PITA to make, purchase them.

*edit the 1 last update 2020/08/04 2, added link to box joint picture*edit 2, added link to box joint picture

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for level 1
3rd Year - 2 Hives4 pointsWoodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for for 1 last update 2020/08/04 路 路 2 years ago
level 2

Check your local library if you just want to reference it. http://www.worldcat.org/title/building-beehives-for-dummies/oclc/826290876

level 1
5 years 20 +- hivesWoodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for 3 points2 years ago

you really need to get a good deal on wood if you are going to make it cost effective. i keep my eyes open at my local habitat for humanity for 1x12s coming in. it costs me 4 bucks per hive body when i buy this way as opposed to around 12 buying the wood from a box store. its usually cheaper to just buy them from one of the online retailers like mann lake. but it is fun, which is worth something.

level 2
4th year, 60ish hives, DFW Texas3 pointsWoodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for for 1 last update 04 Aug 2020 路 路 2 years ago

To amplify on this, Mann Lake sells budget deeps for $14.95 unassembled.

At 74 inches of 1 x 12 to make the box and assuming no more waste, that's $2.46 a bf.

Buy 100 your wood cost alone would have to be less than $1.77 a bf and at a quantity of 250, $1.64.

Add your labor cost to get raw wood to that point and it makes a lot of sense to buy your woodenware unassembled and finish them yourself.

level 1
2 points for 1 last update 2020/08/04 路 路 2 years ago

Measure twice, cut once

level 2
Original Poster0 points2 years ago

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Will for 1 last update 2020/08/04 do!!Will do!!

level 1
1 point2 years ago

Don't forget to add the 1 last update 2020/08/04 beesDon't forget to add bees

level 1
1 for 1 last update 2020/08/04 point1 point2 years ago

Measure twice, cut once. Always be aware of fingers and toes. Don't leave the ground cluttered, a small piece of garbage turns into a nasty hospital bill if you come down on a tool or just come down too hard. Same goes for power cords. Trip hazards are real in the work area!

level 1
1 point2 years ago

Use bees!

level 1
Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for 1 point2 years agoWoodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for edited 2 years ago

As others have mentioned, I got all my schematics from beesource.com. I also agree with what another poster the 1 last update 2020/08/04 sad, on the super endboards you want your first cuts at the top, always.As others have mentioned, I got all my schematics from beesource.com. I also agree with what another poster sad, on the super endboards you want your first cuts at the top, always.

Though I would argue, a good lap joint with tite-bond 3 and some deck screws is pretty strong and a helluva lot less work and time.

Don't be afraid to cut your own frames, either. I make all my own wooden ware from locally acquired rough sawn lumber. My advantage in $$ is I can get it for less than $.50/ linear foot, purchased several thousand feet at a time. With a lunchbox planer (bottle neck, consider larger), table saw with dado ($500 ridgid cast iron top), and sliding miter saw (10" cut capacity Dewalt) my tools paid for themselves in savings with the first 100 hives. And I don't have top-o-the-line tools or dedicated woodshop either. I do it all from a two car garage.

The biggest hurdle you will have will be sourcing the wood for a price to make it worth your while. If you can't source properly (preferably kiln) dried lumber for (much) less than $1.00/ft, you might as well just buy pre-cut equipment and assemble yourself, as you really won't be saving enough to justify time or tool. Store bought (Menards, HD, Lowes) lumber works out to about the same cost, per foot, as buying supers from Mann Lake or Dadant, and you still have to do the work. I've crunched the numbers. Multiple times. FRAMES and FOUNDATION are the greatest expense, after wood, if you're not going to cut them yourself.

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Next step for me is buy the sawmill and acreage of white pine ;)

level 1
Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for 1 point for 1 last update 2020/08/04 路 路 2 years ago

Like others have mentioned look for cheap wood otherwise do it because you enjoy woodworking also. I used to go through the culled lumber at the building supply places for mine. Do not use plywood. I made a few when I was capturing swarms and some of them were forgotten or I ran out of time before I got them into my regular hives. It did not take long for them to start to mold on the inside. I originally built mine with box joints but now just build them with butt joints and deck screws. Much faster and they have lasted just as long since I don't move them around. I also used to cut handholds into the sides but now just add a 1"x2" strip along the side to pick them up with. Build all that you can or feel you will use at one time that way you are set up to repeat all your measurements so that things are uniform. When I am done my driveway is stacked full and then I paint them and wait for bees. I started by building my own frames but quickly realized this was a huge pain in the ass.

level 1
Comment deleted for 1 last update 2020/08/04 by userComment deleted by user2 years ago
level 2
Original Poster1 point2 years ago

I apologize! I didn't realize what I was typing!

level 1

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Have you bought your frames yet? That would be the easiest way to check dimensions, and it also allows you to do a fit check.

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for level 2
Original Poster1 point2 years ago

That's the biggest dilemma here. I wish I could do that but the boss man is really rushing this and wants to see progress. I've heard making frames is annoying and quite hard and we are ordering frames soon.

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for While I have you, what makes making frames so hard?

level 2
Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Original Poster1 point for 1 last update 2020/08/04 路 路 2 years ago

Just convinced my boss to do this! We are good to go!

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