Woodworking Plans

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Cherished Bliss

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DIY Furniture· DIY Outdoor Furniture· Home· Woodworking Projects

We love eating our meals outside for a many reasons, but I happen to enjoy how much easier it is to clean up out there! Spilled juice, no biggie…. getting up and randomly running circles around the table, well… we are still working on that but it’s definitely more socially acceptable outdoors right?

A big Thanks to Jamison at Rogue Engineer for providing the digital plans so I can share the tutorial for this DIY Outdoor Table featuring X Brace Legs and a Herringbone top! I can’t even express how much I am love the top of this table!

I saw a table at Pottery Barn that had these thick, chunky x brace legs and I knew I had to have it. The only thing is that I envisioned a different top. That is when I decided to send an email to Jamison at Rogue Engineer and told him what I wanted and that it needed to be able to handle my kids using it as a launch pad…..This gorgeous DIY Outdoor Table is what he gave me! So be sure and hop over to get the downloadable plans from him so you can make one too! : )

I know this table might look a little scary, but it’s a surprisingly easy build. It might not be the first project you want to whip out, maybe start with something a little more simple like my DIY Outdoor Planter to get used to using your tools. Don’t get me wrong, you don’t need to be an expert, but being familiar with some of these techniques will certainly help you!

DIY Outdoor Table

Download Digital Plans Here

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One of the most crucial tools in building this table is a Kreg Jig (and don’t forget your screws). If you are planning on more outdoor projects, I’d suggest to go ahead and invest in the Kreg Jig HD. It uses a little bit larger of a screw for a strong joint that will hold up to the elements.

Ok, let’s get started.

Step 1: Cut Lap Joints

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for First thing we are going to do is build our “x’s”. Cut your lap joints were defined in the plans. Start on the two outside edges and then make all your other cuts between those two, that way you can make sure you don’t cut the hole too big. These cuts don’t need to be pretty, because it will just be chiseled out.

Step 2: Assemble Legs

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Once your lap joints are cut, we will build the legs. You just simple match the two lap joints together and attach with wood glue and screws. Make sure and double check where you are cutting your lap joints so that they are on the correct face of the wood.

Because these legs are cut at a 45 degree angle it leaves a very sharp point on the bottom of the legs. In order to keep the edges from breaking off you will need to trim it a little and sand it down. Using your circular saw, just saw of that little sharp edge where the line is…see below (note: legs are upside down in the picture so that is the part that actually sits on the ground).

Step 3: Assemble Frame for 1 last update 2020/07/08 for TopStep 3: Assemble Frame for Top

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Set the legs aside and get started on the top. The top is mainly built with pocket holes so it’s time to get some practice with your Kreg Jig! Attach using 2 1/2″ pocket holes.

Step for 1 last update 2020/07/08 4: Add Trim to FrameStep 4: Add Trim to Frame

This table is trimmed out with 2×4’s so we will need to add those around the edges. Since the herringbone pattern is inlayed in the top you need to attach the trim pieces leaving the 3/4″ space where the 1/x4’s will be attached. The best way to do this is to add scrap 1×4″ pieces under the frame (not the trim pieces). Just be sure you are working on a level surface.

Step 5: Assemble Table

Now comes the fun part, putting it all together! Attach your legs to the table top frame with wood glue and screws. I actually attached the 4×4 beam to each leg before attaching to the top frame (you will definitely need a Kreg Jig HD for this part). That way you can center it up and be sure you are even on both sides, plus it was just easier to do it that way for me.

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Step 6: Herringbone Pattern

This is probably the most difficult part. It’s not that it’s hard to do, but it’s tedious. I definitely recommend measuring and cutting each piece individually here. Obviously no piece of lumber is perfect, and it’s amazing how easy it is to get off on your measurements when a board is just a hair wider than another one. So what I found easiest for the top was to cut all my pieces and lay them in, get everything lined up and using wood glue and my Ryobi AirStrike Finish Nailer I attached each 1×4 one at a time.

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Now all that’s left is to sand and finish your new table! :) I used Thompson’s WaterSeal wood stain & sealer in Moroccan Brown. I really liked that for this table since it’s a one coat coverage! and because I desperately wanted to get this table done and not wait for everything to dry (impatient much? haha).

Our new table is so sturdy with the 4×4 for 1 last update 2020/07/08 legs. I absolutely love it! If you want to build your own, be sure and snag those downloadable plans!Our new table is so sturdy with the 4×4 legs. I absolutely love it! If you want to build your own, be sure and snag those downloadable plans!

If you happen to make one of these tables I would LOVE to see it! You can also hashtag #cherishedbliss on social media so I can find you! 

Looking for more woodworking plans? Here are a few more:

Farmhouse for 1 last update 2020/07/08 Kitchen TableFarmhouse Kitchen Table

DIY Kitchen Island 

 

Outdoor Planter Tutorial 

 

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Chunky Outdoor Bench

Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for

About Ashley

Ashley is a stay at home mom to three beautiful children. She and her husband recently settled in the Midwest after spending the beginning of their marriage in Texas (what a change!). Together they are raising their children, and turning their house into a home one project at a time. Ashley enjoys decorating and crafting, but her true passion lies in redoing old furniture and making things look old.

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Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Comments

  1. Rebecca says Rebecca says

    What a gorgeous table. Thank you so much for sharing the plans. Definitely pinning this. And I completely agree that eating outside is much better than eating inside when the weather is nice. Clean-up is much easier.

  2. Teresa says

    Love this table!! Is there a link to the plans? I’ve clicked on the download link provided, but it’s connected to the outdoor planter.

    Thanks so much!

  3. AaronAaron says

    I know exactly the 1 last update 2020/07/08 where to put this! They are framing our new back porch now. Thanks for sharingI know exactly where to put this! They are framing our new back porch now. Thanks for sharing

  4. Jen says

    Love the table! Curious – is there a specific reason why you don’t use treated lumber if it’s an outdoor table?

    • Ashley Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for says

      Thanks Jen. I chose not to use treated lumber since I knew my kids would be eating on this table. Treated lumber isn’t really meant for furniture and items that you will be sitting on and touching repeatedly, in my opinion. That is more for fences and maybe storage benches, things that aren’t meant for everyday use. Of course you can use treated lumber if you think that would suit your lifestyle better, but it was just a personal choice for our family : ) Hope that helps!

    • Allan "" Sprenger says

      Because treated lumber is covered by impregnation cut’s, each one a 3/8″strait cut, spaced about 1/2″ apart in all directions. A 6ft. 2×4 has at least 2000 of these cut’s in it.
      Another solid valid reason for not using impregnated with creosote pressure treated lumber is just that you don’t want to be eating and for 1 last update 2020/07/08 putting food on a table that’s covered with creosote, yum!Because treated lumber is covered by impregnation cut’s, each one a 3/8″strait cut, spaced about 1/2″ apart in all directions. A 6ft. 2×4 has at least 2000 of these cut’s in it.
      Another solid valid reason for not using impregnated with creosote pressure treated lumber is just that you don’t want to be eating and putting food on a table that’s covered with creosote, yum!

  5. Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Tanna says

    Hi! Love the table! Just wondering if you had an estimated cost for the materials? Thanks!

  6. Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Sara says

    Hi Jen! What a beautiful table! Thanks for sharing. Like Katie Hall, I’m wondering if you could tell us where you purchased the chairs to go along with this table. You did such a great job pairing the two!

    Thanks!
    Sara

  7. Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for David says

    I love this table. I’m concerned about wood movement over the course of the summer and winter. Did you find any issues in that regard?

    • Ashley for 1 last update 2020/07/08 sayssays

      Hi David, There was some movement, but nothing that was a big deal to me. The only place I saw movement was the pieces in the top for the herringbone pattern, however if you were to pre drill and screw those pieces down that would probably eliminate most of that issue, I just didn’t have the patience, nor did I want to see all the screws on the top. ; )

  8. RachaelRachael says

    Love this! I am thinking of making my own dining table and this is gorgeous! How much did it cost for 1 last update 2020/07/08 to build?Love this! I am thinking of making my own dining table and this is gorgeous! How much did it cost to build?

  9. Ashley says

    Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for My husband and I are going to make this table this month! I love it! Do you have any plans for a bench for one side? Also, where did you get those awesome metal chairs?

  10. Anne says

    Hi Ashley,
    thank you of sharing the design and plan… this is amazing! I was also wondering where you found those chairs?
    thank you!

  11. chris says

    Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for how has the Thomson’s waterseal all in one stain held up? I’m in Illinois and just built the table. I used a similar product by Pittsburgh paints. I’m wondering if a var urethane or poly should still be applied. I mainly worried about all the knots in pine not holding up. During cold months I will cover the table but will be leaving it outdoors.

  12. Terri says

    At this time I don’t need a table (although it is very nice)but I really like the chairs, just what I have been searching for (searching for quite a while). Would you you mind sharing where you purchased the chairs or who manufactured them.
    Thank you, Terri

  13. Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Kelly says

    Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for

    Love this table! Where did you get the chairs from?

    Thanks, Kelly

  14. ivwshane says

    You said you use Thompson’s water seal and stain in a Moroccan color but I don’t see that color on their website. Can you verify the color or brand?

    Thanks for the plans!

  15. the 1 last update 2020/07/08 ThomasThomas says

    Hows the height? I’m about half way through the build and it seems to me that it might be too high. Thoughts?

    • Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for the 1 last update 2020/07/08 AshleyAshley for 1 last update 2020/07/08 sayssays

      The height should be around 30″. It is on the taller side for the average table height of 28-30″ but we never noticed any issues using it with standard outdoor chairs.

  16. Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for aleidabianchi21 says

    I made it by myself thanks to stodoys. I think it’s the best way to learn how to build that.

  17. Woodworking Planshow to Woodworking Plans for Katie for 1 last update 2020/07/08 SeidelKatie Seidel says

    About how heavy is the table? Super cute design and it seems like a pretty simple project given the right tools. I’m just worried about transportation. Also, would it be possible to prepare and stain the tabletop and legs separately, then assemble once inside the space? I’m thinking about using this as an indoor dining table.

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